Ancient Fiction: The Matrix of Early Christian And Jewish by Jo-Ann A. Brant

By Jo-Ann A. Brant

The essays during this quantity learn the connection among historic fiction within the Greco-Roman international and early Jewish and Christian narratives. they give thought to how these narratives imitated or exploited conventions of fiction to supply kinds of literature that expressed new principles or formed group id in the transferring social and political climates in their personal societies. significant authors and texts surveyed comprise Chariton, Shakespeare, Homer, Vergil, Plato, Matthew, Mark, Luke, Daniel, three Maccabees, the testomony of Abraham, rabbinic midrash, the Apocryphal Acts, Ezekiel the Tragedian, and the Sophist Aelian. This different assortment finds and examines commonly used matters and syntheses within the making: the pervasive use and subversive energy of imitation, the excellence among fiction and heritage, and using heritage within the expression of identification.

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106. 7–18. 6–13). 1–10). 108 For example, Dionysius’s prooi/mion is as follows: I am grateful to you, O King, for the honor which you have shown me, the virtue of self-control,109 and the marriages of all. For you have not allowed a private citizen to be plotted against by a public official. 110 This prooi/mion prompts several rhetorical observations. 113 107. See Quintilian, Inst. 57. 108. For analysis of this speech into its parts, see Hock, “Rhetoric of Romance,” 463. 109. By my translation I reject the emendation proposed by John Jackson (see “The Greek Novelists,” CQ 29 [1935]: 52–57, esp.

79 To be sure, this definition is so brief as to be obscure, but its meaning emerges from the topics that were suggested for student exercises. 80 In other words, an h)qopoii/a requires the student to reveal through speech a person’s character as that person confronts a specific circumstance. 83 Thus students were to have the person respond to features of the present 77. ; Leipzig: Breitkopf & Hartel, 1914), 353–56. 78. For what follows, see also Hock, “Rhetoric of Romance,” 455–59. 79. See Hermogenes, Progymn.

6–13). 1–10). 108 For example, Dionysius’s prooi/mion is as follows: I am grateful to you, O King, for the honor which you have shown me, the virtue of self-control,109 and the marriages of all. For you have not allowed a private citizen to be plotted against by a public official. 110 This prooi/mion prompts several rhetorical observations. 113 107. See Quintilian, Inst. 57. 108. For analysis of this speech into its parts, see Hock, “Rhetoric of Romance,” 463. 109. By my translation I reject the emendation proposed by John Jackson (see “The Greek Novelists,” CQ 29 [1935]: 52–57, esp.

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